There are an interesting range of historical buildings, manor houses and inns in the town dating back as far as the 15th century. Downe Place is recorded as one of Cobham’s most important medieval estates, owned by the Downe family until the 17th century.

In 1822 John Hassell painted a watercolour entitled ‘Payne’s Hill [Painshill, Cobham] the seat of Lady Carhampton’.

Located in central Surrey, north of the chalk Downs and south of the River Thames. The Thames is joined here by the River Mole which was a major reason for the town’s development.

A number of the town’s buildings tell us a lot about the social and religious practices of Cobham since the 17th century. Cobham became a Quaker centre in the 1670s and a Quaker meeting house was built in 1680. In the 18th century, Cobham Workhouse was located on the south eastern side of the town. However, Cobham’s poorest were eventually transferred to Epsom. A schoolroom for the poor was built in 1833. Later this was turned in to a parish room, a fire engine house and, finally, a warehouse.

Early schooling in Cobham seems to have been a largely charitable affair. A local Lord financed a school for forty children in the 1720s and Church Stile House in Church Street was used as a school for crippled children in 1822.

Two bridges over the River Mole were built in the town. Cobham Bridge is said to have been built by Queen Matilda in the 12th century. This wooden structure was replaced with a brick one in 1780. Downside Bridge was first built in the 16th century. This was destroyed by floods in 1968 and the present bridge opened in 1971.

See the catalogue of the St Andrew’s church, Cobham, Parish Records (1409 -1966) held at the Surrey History Centre.

A great deal of the development of Cobham town has taken place within the last century. Until the 20th century, Church Street was the old shopping area of the town, and High Street contained little more than a few houses, a dairy farm and a forge.

Further information

12 Responses to Cobham

  1. M.C.Ash says:

    This picture may be of interest. When the bailey bridge was opened the normal 215A bus service was resumed but had to be withdrawn when the bridge started to bow. The council sponsored a minibus service between Downside and Cobham which had a fare of 6d when it first started. Photograph courtesy of M C Ash.

  2. Lisa Rust says:

    My ggg grandmother Charlotte Drewett was born in 1822 in Downside, Cobham, Surrey. Her father was John Drewett noted on records as a machine maker/millwright. I did a few years ago obtain a CD from the Elmbridge collection and found records of Charlotte’s birth and those of her siblings. I could not however find a record of John and his wife Charlotte’s marriage. I have noticed that The surname Drewett is quite popular in the southern part of the country. There is also a Drewett Mill in the south somewhere. Do I assume they were married elsewhere other than Surrey? Regards Lisa Rust

  3. Craig Mann says:

    I have an old Pub sign that says MANNS at the top and THE TARTAR on the bottom…..is this from Cobham? If someone remembers it, please email me at [email protected] and I will send a picture of it to you to see if it is the right one.

    • Dave radbury says:

      This was a public house situated on Tartar Hill on the old A3 near the cottage hospital

    • H Langford says:

      The Tartar was a public house in Cobham and at one time my Gt Grandparents were the landlords. Their surname was Culliford.The pub has been pulled down now and houses built on the site.

  4. Sandi Nelson says:

    Can you assist me with determining if our relative George Simmonds (Simmons) born in 1807 in Brighton Sussex could be the same George who was baptized at St. Andrew’s church in Cobham, Surrey, in Sept. 1807 with parent listed as William Simmonds. I’m not sure the 2 locations are close enough together to have those 2 listings be the same George Simmonds. Any help you can provide on proximity of Brighton & Cobham would be helpful to me. Many thanks.

    • A Lawrence says:

      Brighton Sussex, and Cobham, Surrey are not close enough together for that.

      Your relative might be George Stephen Simmons baptized in Hastings 12 August 1807, with father William Carby Simmons and mother Martha.

      • Karen says:

        Hi,

        I’m interested to know if William Carby Simmons and Martha had any other children? I found George Stephen b 1807 and William Carby b 1802, but am trying to connect Ann b approx 1796. Can you confirm Ann and/or any other children of the two please? Thank you.

  5. Dave Dodson says:

    Hi I am trying to find details of my grandfather who lived, and we believe was born in Cobham Surrey. Also trying to find out the name of his first wife who was the headmistress of the school in Cobham, the school we believe was called, as it is now St Andrews.
    My granddads name was Charles William Dodson, he was originaly a cabinet maker around the start of the first world war. We believe granddad was born around 1895 ish…
    Does anyone know any details of granddad or his first wife ?

    Many Thanks

    Dave Dodson

    • Geoff Ayres says:

      I think we are distantly related. Charles William Dodson was older than you suggest, born in the 3rd qtr. of 1972, he married Emma Barnes in the last qtr. of 1892. I think Emma died in the 1st qtr. of 1904 aged 39 and Charles remarried in the last qtr. of 1908. His parents were William and Amelia Jane nee Watmore. His younger brother Walter Henry married my great aunt Elsie Rose Kislingbury. If you look in the 1881 census they are listed as “Dollson” in error. Geoff Ayres.

  6. Eve Harrison says:

    Does anyone remember the words to the St Andrews Secondary school Cobham Surrey school song from the 1950s? It started “Up Cobham up ne’er flinch in face of danger” my brother and I are former pupils and now both live in Australia. My maiden name was Yvonne Shepherd.

  7. Eve Harrison says:

    I have a jug with Cobham on the bottom I have had from years ago. Where was the pottery in Cobham and when did it close.

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