Looking down what is actually the 'back' entrance to Garden Cottage

Looking down what is actually the ‘back’ entrance to Garden Cottage

Photo 1. Looking down what is actually the ‘back’ entrance to Garden Cottage but this was the common entrance, c1950. The gantry at the bottom of the lane was used to carry coal and/or coke to and from the big coke-making sheds out of view on the right behind the cottages. See photo 4.

View of the three cottages at the top of the ‘T’ formed with Garden Cottages

View of the three cottages at the top of the ‘T’ formed with Garden Cottages

Photo 2. This is the view of the three cottages at the top of the ‘T’ formed with Garden Cottages, c1950. From left to right are 33, 35 and 37 East Street and I was born in No. 35. In No. 33 were the Marsh family trading as chimney sweeps “Tester & Tuck” there were two sons only Alan and Leslie, the oldest. Leslie Marsh was 19 years old when he joined the Navy as a Stoker 2nd class. He was killed aboard the HMS Penelope, a light cruiser, on 18th Feb 1944 in the bay of Naples, Italy. They were torpedoed by a German U boat No. U410 as they were leaving after refuelling and rearming in the port of Naples. In No. 37 lived an old couple who I believe were named Edwards but not sure.

View from the back bedroom window at No. 35.

View from the back bedroom window at No. 35.

Photo 3. View from the back bedroom window at No. 35 its back garden and the gardens of Garden Cottages served by a narrow lane, c1950. A long fence can be seen on the right which was the border twixt the lane and the property of the Keeling family who, I believe were ‘removers and furnishers’. The trees on the Keeling’s side of the fence , top right corner, were damson trees and overhung the lane a lot. Needless to say, we scrumped them but also collected them and my Gran made damson jam which was delicious.

From back garden of No. 35, looking down Garden Cotts

From back garden of No. 35, looking down Garden Cotts

Photo 4. From back garden of No. 35, looking down Garden Cotts, notice the gantry as mentioned in photo1 and what I called the coke-making sheds which now can be seen, c1950. My bike can be seen in the foreground and the Anderson shelter re-used as a shed after the war. My brother and I are seen helping to install the shelter originally in 1940. (See Photo 6)

In back garden of No. 35 looking towards the property of the Keeling family.

In back garden of No. 35 looking towards the property of the Keeling family.

Photo 5. In back garden of No. 35 looking towards the property of the Keeling family, c1950. The ‘box’ on the side of the house was a high level porch to protect Mrs Keeling’s entrance to her home. I believe the lower half of the building was used for storage. As a young boy I met Mrs Keeling a few times and ran a few errands for her. She seemed very nice and must have been 60 ish.

Building/burying an Anderson shelter, c1940.

Building/burying an Anderson shelter, c1940.

Photo 6. This was taken c.1940 and shows my brother supposedly helping Dad to erect/bury the Anderson shelter. I remember waking up in the shelter a number of times during the war but one time in particular a bomb flattened the my infants school one night but I didn’t hear a thing. The school was further up East Street on the opposite side of the road just a bit up from level with the swimming pool.

Images and text courtesy of Brian Waterman

7 Responses to East Street, Epsom, c 1950

  1. john says:

    brian, I remember the night the buzz bomb hit the school, I was in the shelter with my mum and my sister velma,and bruv peter.what was amazing when we went up the road next morning, the teacher ask us to look for our exercise books which were scattered everywhere,lovely days brian.What I did do brian was swap scrapnell remains, to see who could get the best ones? John’

  2. Ivan says:

    I have been trying to get photographs of the Epsom Waterworks, taken from East St in Epsom, next door to the Telephone exchange. Anyone have any?

  3. Miranda says:

    Does anyone have pictures of East Street Epsom in the late 70s early 80s.
    60 East Street as it was them Loxford House, The Chocolate Box Sweet Shop.

  4. Gordon Bishop says:

    Reading your ‘John’ comments it appears that John was my neighbour John Pocock!! Is it you John!

    • john pocock says:

      yes I remember you well

    • Brian Waterman says:

      Hi Gordon. I Remember you. You lived in the wooden clad (I think) houses almost opposite Keelings place. I think your house was the last on the right looking at the houses. Titch Hutchinson the barber and Stemps sweet shop were up the road from you. We played together occasionally I recall.
      If you go onto Facebook, There is are two groups 1. Epsom Past and Present, and 2. Epsom,Ewell,Cheam,Memories,Local History and Genealogy. Have a look, I have posted many times on there. Where do you live now. I live in Herne bay in Kent.
      Very best regards
      Brian Waterman.

    • Brian Waterman says:

      Hi Gordon My email is [email protected] if you want to get in touch.
      Take care
      Brian Waterman

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