QEF Banstead Place

Banstead Place 1960s - Playing with a medicine ball to improve co-ordination and to strengthen arm muscles. Behind them one of the older residents is exercising his arms, to strengthen muscles and help to bring back movement. In the background are steps with rails on both sides - for those who are learning to walk again.

Banstead Place 1960s – Playing with a medicine ball to improve co-ordination and to strengthen arm muscles. Behind them one of the older residents is exercising his arms, to strengthen muscles and help to bring back movement. In the background are steps with rails on both sides – for those who are learning to walk again.

In 1956 Banstead Place was set up as part of the Dorincourt estates, sponsored by the College and the National Association for the Paralysed. The aim was to train those who had been categorised as ‘young chronic sick’ in all activities of daily living.

In 1974 the focus of Banstead Place shifted to become a special unit for young people of school age with disabilities. This was different to adult units and was a place where abilities could be objectively assessed with a focus on independence, mobility, and further education.


A summary of Morigue Cornwall’s oral history interview, with a selection of key quotes, is available to download as a pdf (PDF) document.

Over the past twenty years the service has become a specialised centre for acquired brain injury rehabilitation, keeping the historic focus on supporting younger adults. The atmosphere and ethos of Banstead place still has the personalised approach to therapy, combined with community and residential programmes. Text and images courtesy of the Queen Elizabeth’s Foundation for Disabled People.

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