Man of Letters: Sherriff’s Later Career

Sherriff’s Boxoffice Blue Ribbon Award certificate for This Above All, 1942 (SHC ref 2332/8/11/7)

Sherriff’s Boxoffice Blue Ribbon Award certificate for This Above All, 1942
(SHC ref 2332/8/11/7)

Sherriff ’s prolific output continued during and after the Second World War. Following the outbreak of the war he unsuccessfully attempted to return to Britain, and was then put to work writing and co-writing scripts for That Hamilton Woman (1941), This Above All (1942) and the Academy Award winning Mrs Miniver (1942), for which he was an uncredited writer.

Scene from the Mermaid Theatre’s production of The Long Sunset, 1961 (SHC ref 2332/6/10/3/2/4)

Scene from the Mermaid Theatre’s production of The Long Sunset, 1961
(SHC ref 2332/6/10/3/2/4)

By the end of 1944 Sherriff was back in England. His revived post-war career as a playwright is reflected in scripts, programmes, photographs and correspondence for plays including Miss Mabel (1948), The White Carnation (1953), The Long Sunset (1955) and his final staged play A Shred of Evidence (1960). He also wrote the children’s novels King John’s Treasure (1954) and The Siege of Swayne Castle (1973), which was his last published work.

However, it was his work as a screenplay writer which yielded his most notable successes during this phase of his career. In 1956 Sherriff was nominated for BAFTA Best British Screenplay Awards for The Dam Busters and also The Night My Number Came Up, both of which had been released in 1955.

Download a pdf (PDF) copy of the original exhibition panel.

Click on the links below to see the exhibition text and images:

To Journey’s End and Beyond: The Exhibition

The Man Behind Journey’s End

R C Sherriff’s Family Background

Sherriff and Kingston Grammar School

Sherriff and the Artists Rifles

Sherriff with the 9th East Surreys

The Genesis of Journey’s End

A Star is Born

The Making of a Playwright

The 1930s: Sherriff’s Golden Decade

The Curtain Comes Down