Updraft Kiln

Kilns are in effect large ovens, used for a variety of purposes from firing pottery, drying bricks to burning limestone.

A replica updraft kiln, built for Surrey Rural Industries Day  at The Rural Life Centre, Tilford, June 2008. Image: Janet Nixon

A replica updraft kiln, built for Surrey Rural Industries Day
at The Rural Life Centre, Tilford, June 2008
Image: Janet Nixon

Updraft kilns were permanent structures in which the air passes from the base of the kiln out through the top. Material to be fired is placed on a natural or raised floor so that heat and fumes from a fire built adjacent or below the material is drawn up through and around it before passing out through a vent in the roof or superstructure. Technically, updraft kilns were very inefficient and were later replaced by superior downdraft kilns.

Reconstruction of the 13th century tile kiln found in Borelli Yard, Farnham. Illustration: Jim Farrant / Nicholas Riall

Reconstruction of the 13th century tile kiln found in Borelli Yard, Farnham. Illustration: Jim Farrant / Nicholas Riall

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