Marjorie Foster (1893 – 1974)

The first woman to win the King’s Prize in 1930, the highest award at the National Rifle Championships, Bisley, beating over 1000 competitors. In 1939 she was runner-up for the same award.

Marjorie Foster (1893 - 1974).<br>Courtesy of Surrey Heath Museum

Marjorie Foster (1893 – 1974).
Courtesy of Surrey Heath Museum

Shooting from the age of eight, she learned to shoot on the miniature range of the Camberley & Yorktown Rifle Club. As an adult in the 1920s, she joined the South London Rifle Club as it was the only one to admit women, and won their championship four times.

After winning the King’s Prize she was carried back in triumph on the Frimley Fire Brigade tender and was taken around Frimley and Frimley Green, while a band played “See the conquering hero comes”. She was also presented with a car, bought by public subscription. Miss Foster later went on to represent her country on many occasions.

She lived in Potteries Lane, Mytchett where she and her partner, Miss Blanche Badcock, ran a poultry farm on their smallholding.

Some men did not approve of her taking part in the shooting competitions as the extract from a letter below shows:

Your winning of the premier event absolutely sickened me, as it must have done thousands of other service and ex-service men, Not, mind you, in any personal enmity towards you, but simply the utter incongruity of the position.

Useful Links

Bisley Camp and the National Rifle Association

Frimley

Surrey Heath Museum

The National Rifle Association Museum

20th Century Surrey

One thought on “Marjorie Foster (1893 – 1974)”

  1. Lesley Sharpe says:

    Did this Blanche Badcock have a nursing qualification as I am trying to find someone of that presumably uncommon name

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