Players in 18th century costume

Players in 18th century costume

Send and Ripley History Society, together with Ripley Cricket Club put together a one day celebration of cricket on Ripley Village Green on Sunday 19th June 2011.

Three generations of cricketers were involved as, following a morning colts match, thirty aspiring cricketers were given free Kwik cricket coaching in the lunch interval.

After lunch Ripley and Send (now Horsley and Send) took to the field as they must have done many times in the last 250 years. The Mayor of Guildford, Terence Patrick, was on hand to bowl the first ball at the regulation two stumps (1774 Regulations). Both teams, dressed in 18th Century garb, entered into the spirit of the event and managed some huge blows despite batting with heavy curved bats.

Ripley squeaked home by one run.

Terence Patrick, the Mayor of Guildford, bowls the first ball.

Terence Patrick, the Mayor of Guildford, bowls the first ball.

Player in 18th century costume

Player in 18th century costume

Player in 18th century costume

Player in 18th century costume

This game celebrated Lumpy Stevens, who was born in the parish of Send (which then included Ripley) in 1734 and was the greatest bowler of his day. So accurate was he that he frequently bowled between the two stumps without dislodging the bail and this led to the introduction of the third stump. Appropriately, Guy Pullen, the President of Ripley Cricket Club, presented a trophy made from a stump to the winning captain.

This is one of the Surreys Sporting Life 2011 series of events, co-ordinated by Surrey Heritage, supported by Surrey County Council and awarded the London 2012 Inspire Mark.

All images courtesy of Lalage Grundy/Surrey Heritage.

 

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